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Professionals visit The Hague
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Professionals visit The Hague

AN AUSTRALIAN international legal academic will experience first hand the workings of the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague when he takes up a temporary appointment with its…

AN AUSTRALIAN international legal academic will experience first hand the workings of the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague when he takes up a temporary appointment with its Appeals Chamber.

Senior lecturer in international law at the University of Western Sydney, Steven Freeland, was among those selected as a ‘visiting professional’ and left this week to take up his secondment. He said the ICC was becoming an increasingly important institution, with the Prosecutor of the Court currently investigating alleged human rights abuses in Darfur in the Sudan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Uganda and the Ivory Coast.

“Over the past decade, there has undoubtedly been a growing momentum towards the ‘internationalisation’ of justice, with the global community outraged at terrible crimes that, in the past, would have largely gone unpunished because of a lack of political will,” Freeland said. “Setting up the ICC was an extremely important step towards ending the era of impunity for international crimes that largely prevailed from the end of World War Two until the 1990s.”

The ICC was established in July 2002 to hear cases against those accused of genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and the undefined crime of aggression. Freeland said he was “honoured” by the appointment.

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