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US/UK Update: DLA Piper defends sex discrimination claim, things get worse for Toyota, and iPhone
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US/UK Update: DLA Piper defends sex discrimination claim, things get worse for Toyota, and iPhone

DLA Piper is contesting allegations of sexual discrimination brought by a former partner who claims she was asked to leave the firm after she became pregnant, reports legalweek.com. The woman…

DLA Piper is contesting allegations of sexual discrimination brought by a former partner who claims she was asked to leave the firm after she became pregnant, reports legalweek.com. The woman had been with the firm for 12 years before she was allegedly asked to leave.

Lawyers acting on behalf of disgruntled consumers have added to Toyota's woes by bringing forward claims of racketeering and unfair business practices, reports law.com. It is expected that further lawsuits might be filed in the days to come as more information comes to light following congressional enquiries. "The more we find out, the more we think Toyota is giving false information," said the plaintiffs' attorney, Tim Howard.

Lehman Brothers' creditors could go after Linklaters after it was revealed the bank misused an advice prepared by the firm in order to "tidy up" its balance sheets prior to its collapse, reports The Lawyer. A report released last week found the bank had used the advice to make £50 billion ($82.9 billion) disappear from its US balance sheet.

A former partner at US firm McGuireWoods has admitted abusing his position of power to accumulate $US10 million ($10.9 million) in illegal takings, reports law.com. Louis Zehil, a securities lawyer, pleaded guilty to committing, and conspiracy to commit, securities fraud in his position as counsel to numerous small companies.

US firm Morrison & Foerster has become the first major law firm to release an iPhone application, reports The Lawyer. The application, named MoFo2Go, can be downloaded for free and allows users to research partners, read articles which appear in the in-house magazine and even play games.

A US court has ruled that noisy love-making which led police to believe someone was in danger was sufficient reason to embark on an unwarranted search, which later led to a drug bust, reports law.com. Responding to an emergency call, police entered the premises of a man who explained the origins of the noise. However, police saw marijuana and conducted a search.

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