Trolley-load litigation widespread: court

By The New Lawyer|04 March 2013

A Supreme Court judge has delivered a rare and costly rebuke to a legal team for "trolley-load litigation", an act that is widespread in courts but almost impossible to stop.

British Virgin Islands law firm, Michael Wilson & Partners, and its Sydney lawyers have been ordered to pay the cost of their opponents' trawling through a mountain of documents after they dumped 18 new folders of material on them midtrial, reports the Brisbane Times.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Justice Clifford Einstein said it was a clear example of "trolley-load litigation". That is, "the practice of a party in litigation with little or no notice to flood its opponent with materials, and then to insist that whilst its opponent is entitled to a period in which to endeavour to absorb the new materials, that period should be minuscule".

Trolley-load litigation widespread: court
Intro image

SPONSORED CONTENT

style="font: normal normal normal 12px/normal 'Trebuchet MS'; ">British Virgin Islands law firm, Michael Wilson & Partners, and its Sydney lawyers have been ordered to pay the cost of their opponents' trawling through a mountain of documents after they dumped 18 new folders of material on them midtrial, reports the Brisbane Times.

Justice Clifford Einstein said it was a clear example of "trolley-load litigation". That is, "the practice of a party in litigation with little or no notice to flood its opponent with materials, and then to insist that whilst its opponent is entitled to a period in which to endeavour to absorb the new materials, that period should be minuscule".

Trolley-load litigation widespread: court
Intro image
lawyersweekly logo
The Bar

latest

South Australia

Inquiry into sexual harassment in the legal profession ‘unnecessary’, SA Law Society says

renewable energy investment platform

Infrastructure Capital Group acquires renewable energy investment platform

Nick Maley

Holman Webb adds workplace relations partner

David Donnelly

Allens calls for changes to Australia’s infrastructure pipeline 

FROM THE WEB
Recommended by Spike Native Network