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Lawyers, judges, rank high on honours list

Lawyers, judges, rank high on honours list

The legal profession was recognised in this week's Queen’s Birthday Honours List, with members of the judiciary and those committed to legal education taking the lead.

THE legal profession was recognised in this week’s Queen’s Birthday Honours List, with members of the judiciary and those committed to legal education taking the lead.

Graham Greenleaf, the man behind the free legal information site AustLii and professor of law at the University of New South Wales, was this week placed among those handed the Queen’s yearly formal acknowledgements.

Greenleaf, who was given the Member of the Order of Australian in the general division (AM), has for years been working toboost private contributions to AustLii, the free legal information site, from law firms and other organisations. 

Graeme Samuel, the head of the AustralianCompetition and Consumer Commission, was handed a Companion of the Order of Australia (AC) for “eminent service to public administration through contributions in economic reform and competition law”. He was also recognised for his work in the community through leadership roles and with sporting andcultural organisation.

Samuel told The Sydney Morning Herald that his work at the ACCC has been the pinnacle of his career, noting that Australia is a leading nation on competition.

Michael Rozenes, chief judge of the County Court of Victoria and former director of the Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions, was handed an Officer of the Order of Australia (AO) accolade for “distinguished service to the judiciary”. His contributions to law reform and legal education were also noted.

John Von Doussa was also handed an AO for “distinguished service to the law, particularly as president of the Australian Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission, as a Judge through contributions to Federal and International Courts, and to higher education”.

Anthony Rundle received an AO for “distinguished service to the Parliament of Tasmania through leading law reform policy, the advancement of government services and economic development, and to the community”.

George Palmer was handed a Member of the Order of Australia (AM) for service to the law as a judge of the Supreme Court of New South Wales, and to music as a composer and through leadership roles with a range of cultural bodies.

Linda Dessau received the same accolade for service to the judiciary, particularly through contributions in the area offamily law policy and practice, and to the community.

David Gardiner was handed a Member of the Order of Australia “for service to university administration at the Queensland University of Technology, to legal education, and to a range of professional associations”.

Derek Price also received that award “for service to the law and to the judiciary, to the development and delivery of justice initiatives for the Indigenous community, children and young persons, and through contributions to legal organisations”.

Receiving a Medal of the Order of Australia(OAM) was Philip Grano “for service to people with disabilities throughadvocacy organisations, and to the law”. Also, Regina Perton received an OAM “for service to administrative law and to the community, particularly in the areas of equal opportunity and multiculturalism”.

Meanwhile, Peter Lahy received a Public Service Medal “for outstanding public service in the provision of high quality legal advice to Australian Government departments and agencies”.

Robert Patch received the same award “for outstanding public service in developing the legal framework for a new national personal property securities system”.


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