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Balancing act: Long hours needed to get ahead at work

Balancing act: Long hours needed to get ahead at work

Employees feel the need to work overtime on a regular basis to get ahead in their careers, according to a new career progression survey.

Employees feel the need to work overtime on a regular basis to get ahead in their careers, according to a new career progression survey.

WORKING AROUND THE CLOCK: A new survey has suggested workers feel the need to work regular overtime to get ahead at work.
A survey of 2000 employees conducted in August by the Chartered Management Institute (CMI) has revealed that almost half (42 per cent) of employees feel they are further behind in their careers than they would like to be at this stage in their lives.

And while some individuals blame their slow progress on those around them, others accept that they have the power to bring about change.

According to the survey, some employees (22 per cent) believe they've been overlooked for a promotion or pay rise in the last 12 months because their employer doesn't have the funds, while others claim their boss is not fighting for them enough (9 per cent). In contrast, many respondents admit they need to get more experience (13 per cent) or that they do not have the right training or qualifications to advance in their careers (6 per cent).

When it comes to career progression, almost half of employees (44 per cent) believe they need to work overtime on a regular basis; 37 per cent believe they should take on additional responsibility for no extra money; and 45 per cent believe studying in their spare time for a professional qualification will help them get ahead.

"I believe the best guarantee of employability is to keep learning and studying to gain new qualifications and skills, which will indicate to future potential employers a desire to think and work in new ways and that is very attractive from an employer's point of view," the chief executive of health insurance provider Simplyhealth, Des Benjamin, told CMI in response to the survey.

CMI board member Philippa Williamson, who believes qualifications demonstrate personal commitment, added: "Skills have to remain current. How a leader dealt with something five years ago may no longer be applicable in today's working environment and people who are responsible for the development of others must bear this in mind, first taking responsibility for themselves".

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