Employment law gets a hit of The Office

Employment law gets a hit of The Office

03 March 2012 By Lawyers Weekly

Ever wondered how Michael Scott, the fictional boss at the Scranton branch of paper company Dunder Mifflin, gets away with his behaviour in the US version of The Office

Ever wondered how Michael Scott, the fictional boss at the Scranton branch of paper company Dunder Mifflin, gets away with his behaviour in the US version of The Office?

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Well one employment law firm explores such antics with reference to employment law, in their aptly named employment law blog, That's What She Said.

The US firm, Ford & Harrison, explores the TV series episode by episode, as Scott offends every minority group under the sun and Dunder Mifflin employees experience everything from sexual harassment to unfair competition and defamation.

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Take the episode entitled "Chair Model" as an example, where Scott demands that all employees provide him with candidates to serve as the mother of his children. Ford & Harrison lawyer Julie Elgar finds that, surprisingly, Scott's demands don't actually violate any significant employment laws - especially given the fact that the demand was made of all employees, and not, for example, only female employees.

Still, Elgar reminds other bosses that "allowing managers to require their subordinates to act as match-makers as a term and condition of their continued employment isn't a good idea".

Employment law gets a hit of The Office
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