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Women rank high in partnership promotions

Women rank high in partnership promotions

Freehills has moved more women than men to its partnership in string of promotions this week.

FREEHILLS has moved four women to its partnership in string of partner promotions this week.

The firm confirmed today that of six partner promotions, four of those were of women.

The new partners will take up their roles from 1 July 2010, keeping total partner numbers at the firm broadly static at 206.

The firm said the high proportion of women reflects the growing representation of women studying law and entering legal practice with commercial law firms.

Freehills’ CEO Gavin Bell said he was pleased the numbers were in line with the growing numbers of women studying law and working in the more junior ranks.

‘We only ever promote to partnership based on merit and a strong business case, and it’s pleasing to see we have the quality of people who can offer our clients the best legal and commercial advice in the market,” he said.

Freehills’ new partners include Jason Betts (litigation, Sydney), Kate Cahill (projects, Brisbane), Evelyn Halls (corporate, Melbourne), Andrew Rich (corporate, Sydney), Amanda Wales (banking and finance, Sydney), Sharon Wilson (corporate, Perth).

In March this year, the federal Government’s Equal Opportunity for Women in the Workplace Agency (EOWA) listed 12 law firms with offices in Australia as demonstrating they have policies and practices supporting women across their organisations. Freehills was one of those firms.

Corrs Chambers Westgarth, Baker & McKenzie, Allens Arthur Robinson, Blake Dawson, Cooper Grace Ward, Holding Redlich, Gilbert + Tobin, Maddocks, Mallesons Stephen Jaques, McCullough Robertson and Sparke Helmore were also acknowledged.

The law firms were ranked among 95 total organisations on the government’s employer of choice for women list.

“By applying for and receiving this citation, these organisations are not only meeting the pre-requisites and criteria, but are publicly declaring their commitment to making their workplaces equitable,” EOWA acting director Mairi Steele said.

“They know they are not perfect, but they are working hard to make their organisations good places for women to work.”

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