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Water man turns court into religious whine

Water man turns court into religious whine

A business man in an IP dispute over bottled water has asked the judge on the matter if he is Jewish or a Freemason.The Sydney Morning Herald reports that Paul Makucha, who is being sued by…

A business man in an IP dispute over bottled water has asked the judge on the matter if he is Jewish or a Freemason.

The Sydney Morning Herald reports that Paul Makucha, who is being sued by Sydney Water with regard to his water bottling business, asked to have Justice John Sackar of the NSW Supreme Court disqualified from hearing the case because he would not reveal his religious identity.

Makucha asked Justice Sackar if he was a Freemason because he was "terrified" of the masons, whom he said "conceal the crimes of their brother masons". He also requested that the Judge be disqualified if he is Jewish, because "they may be influenced by religious beliefs regarding intellectual property".

Makucha also claimed that the NSW Treasurer, Eric Roozendaal, who has shares in Sydney Water, had used masonic code in a published picture in January because "his eyes were looking up - that's an imitation of Jesus".

Justice Sacker refused to reveal what religion he may or may not practice and also refused to stand down from the case.

Makucha has what could be described as a colourful past.

In 2003, when he was a billionaire businessman living in the "Toaster" building in Sydney's Circular Quay, he took out nine apprehended violence orders against fellow residents after a dispute about parking spots.

During a civil case in 2004, Makucha was jailed and strip-searched for contempt of court by Magistrate Pat O'Shane, with the NSW Court of Appeal later finding he was denied procedural fairness.

Makucha is obviously enduring hard times now for in relation to this matter, the NSW Supreme Court was told last year that he only had $10 in cash for living expenses.

Folklaw thinks that Makucha needs to pour himself a tall glass of water, calm down, and concentrate on the legal merits of this matter rather than the religious beliefs of the judge.

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