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Profession kicks up its heels in 300th celebrations

Profession kicks up its heels in 300th celebrations

Australia’s leading national legal magazine held a celebration in Sydney last week to celebrate the milestone of its 300th issue. Lawyers Weekly staff was joined by representatives from most of…

Australia’s leading national legal magazine held a celebration in Sydney last week to celebrate the milestone of its 300th issue.

Lawyers Weekly staff was joined by representatives from most of Australia’s top-tier law firms as well as a good number of mid-tier and boutique firms as well. Also in attendance were a large number of Lawyers Weeklys sponsors, many of whom have been associated with the publication since its very first issue in June 2000.

Hosted by law firm Herbert Geer & Rundle, the cocktail party saw guests treated to the same view of Sydney Harbour as showcased in the television drama Hell Has Harbour Views, starring Matt Day and Lisa McCune, with the offices having been used for filming prior to Herbert Geer & Rundle taking occupancy.

Lawyers Weekly editor Kate Gibbs told the 150 odd guests in attendance the magazine was well aware that lawyers had the busiest schedules of all professional services occupations. As such, she said that the magazine was very much targeted at being a one-stop shop for its busy readership who may not otherwise have time to keep up to date in all aspects of their lives.

“Thanks to Lawyers Weekly you have all the information you need about your profession — be it your competitor’s recent top deal, the latest complaints about tort reform, some lawyer’s trek on the Kokoda Trail, or the very best gossip — wrapped up in those beautiful glossy pages,” she said.

Gibbs also thanked the many people who had contributed to the magazine’s ongoing success, outlining that the magazine had seen significant changes throughout its history.

“At 300, we’ve filled more than 10,000 pages, had three editors, three publishers, two news editors, seven designers, three redesigns, 42 humble apologies, 354 letters to the editor, two out-of-court settlements, and a yet to be defined number of unbillable hours. I’ve been made to cry only once, though admittedly in my first week, by a certain managing partner who has now left the ranks.”

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