Soy you think you can sue?

By Lawyers Weekly|04 March 2012

An American inmate is suing the Florida prison system for subjecting him to "cruel and unusual punishment".Why is this a laughing matter, you ask? Let's just make it clear that this guy is not…

An American inmate is suing the Florida prison system for subjecting him to "cruel and unusual punishment".

Why is this a laughing matter, you ask?

Let's just make it clear that this guy is not in Guantanamo, and the reason for which he is suing is the lack of pork he gets a dinner time. And this, apparently, is enough to be in breach of the Eight Amendment of the United States Constitution.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Folklaw has reported on the contentious nature of pork in prisons before, but this time, the scenario is even more ludicrous.

CBS Tampa reports that Eric Harris, a 32-year-old pedophile serving a life sentence, is arguing that the Lake Correctional Institution's decision to serve meat-reduced meals is significantly affecting his quality of his life.

To Harris's aid has come the Weston A. Price Foundation, a special interest group with an apparent jihad against soy products (only in America). The group has vowed to cover legal costs and plans to launch a class action with other prisoners, prison guards and ordinary meat-loving taxpayers.

Apparently, the foundation began hearing complaints from Florida prisoners back in 2009 when cooks began replacing 70 per cent of meat with soy substitutes.

As a result, the prisoners claim to be suffering a whole range of health problems, including chronic constipation (eased only by debilitating diarrhea), vomiting, fainting, heart palpitations and mysterious rashes.

SPONSORED CONTENT

According to Harris, this constitutes cruel and unusual punishment.

A spokesperson from the Department of Corrections clarified that meals are half soy, half poultry, and that serving 100 per cent meat would double the $47 million food budget.

American courts have previously held that prisons must serve nutritious meals to inmates, but this does not mean they have to adhere to a prisoner's idea of home cooking.

The spokesperson said their meals do indeed meet standards and comply with federal nutrition guidelines.

Folklaw wonders whether adherents to some of Paddington's, Fremantle's or St Kilda's trendiest cafes will also soon begin to suffer such debilitating, cruel and unusual side effects ...

Soy you think you can sue?
Intro image
lawyersweekly logo
SME Law

latest

Two Australians elected to Ashurst board 

2 Australians elected to Ashurst board 

Simon Overland

Simon Overland feels ‘singled out’ by Lawyer X in new submissions

Sam Burrett

Maximising your real hourly rate post-pandemic

Hamilton Locke adds 2 new partners

Hamilton Locke adds 2 new partners

FROM THE WEB
Recommended by Spike Native Network